Marvin Miller and Ted Simmons Elected to Baseball Hall of Fame

Marvin Miller and Ted Simmons Elected to Baseball Hall of Fame


In 2008, four years before he died, Miller sent a letter to the writers’ association saying he didn’t want to be considered anymore.

“These changes resulted in a vastly more competitive game, fan interest, and increased wealth for all, including the owners of baseball clubs,” his son, Peter Miller, said in 2013. “Although he enjoyed the recognition, my father did what he did not for fame and glory, but for justice and for equitable labor-management relations. To treat that as something of lesser value than personal fame is really to dishonor him and the players.”

Nicknamed Simba for his shoulder-length hair, Simmons was an outspoken opponent of President Richard Nixon and the Vietnam War. In the days before free agency, he played much of the 1972 season without a contract because of a pay dispute, finally agreeing to a two-year deal in late July.

Now 70, Simmons received 17 of 456 votes in 1994, falling short of the 5 percent threshold to remain on the ballot. Simmons was on 11 of 16 ballots when the modern era committee met in 2017 and elected Jack Morris with 14 votes and Alan Trammell with 13.

Simmons has benefited from modern metrics such as a Baseball Reference WAR of 50.3. Eight other players who were primarily catchers topped 50, and they are all in the Hall: Johnny Bench, Yogi Berra, Gary Carter, Bill Dickey, Carlton Fisk, Gabby Hartnett, Mike Piazza and Ivan Rodriguez.

Simmons hit .300 or higher seven times and finished with 2,472 hits. Among players who were primarily catchers, his RBI are second to Berra’s 1,430 and his hits are second to Rodríguez’s 2,844.

Dave Parker received seven votes, and Steve Garvey and Lou Whitaker six each. Tommy John, Don Mattingly, Thurman Munson and Dale Murphy all got three or fewer.



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